Akihabara Massacre

By bluemist on June 11th, 2008

My condolences to all the people affected by this incident.

People die everyday, but modern media tends to lean on the more controversial ones rather than focus on the needs of the hungry and war-torn in other parts of the world. I guess they were having a field day when this happened. After all, shock happens when it’s rare and one-in-a-million.

It’s a perfect recipe. Akihabara, massacre, otaku culture. Same thing with the US version. Columbine, massacre, video games. That’s two of my own hobbies there. So, in the “impossible” event that I freak out, get tired of life and start killing people on the streets, pundits will only need to refer to my non-conformities to find out what kind of person I am. Great.

Continue your idiocy you stereotyping, typecasting, racist people.

But by saying that, am I not the same stereotyping, typecasting, racist person? You throw stones at me, I throw stones too. What a fundamental problem in modern society. This kind of behavior can’t be helped, really. A hopeless case for someone who strives for peace in this world.

While other people would say that this story will just die out, I say never. It doesn’t deserve to die. Let the debates continue. Issues like discrimination should always be talked about. I am not a US citizen, but I like that you have a non-conformist guy to potentially be your President (please vote Obama).

I guess the Tragedy, Hope title would have been better applied to this story. Let me connect a bit of the Sakura factor in this one too. Remember, Sakura was different. She was eternally young. Wouldn’t that be an issue of discrimination/envy in their Da Capo world? We don’t see that in the games. I imagine that sometime between those 50 years, there came a time when people had become suspicious of Sakura. People may label her as a witch, deep inside feeling envious that she can never grow old… or not die at all even. But I also imagine at some point, people start seeing her beyond her physical appearance. As a person. As the same human being that they all are, despite the minor difference. Eventually they loved her, elected her as school principal, and possibly be a huge contributor in society. Her sakura magic research may even be more useful someday, and somehow people may trust her in searching for the truth in the magic. This is the hidden story that I wanted to believe. I hope society can learn from this too, accepting differences of other people instead of persecuting them. Maybe the Akihabara tragedy may have been avoided if the world, and all the people in it, were in a more open-minded state of being.

3 Comments

Posted By: Ronin On: June 11, 2008 At: 2:32 pm

It’s a perfect recipe. Akihabara, massacre, otaku culture. Same thing with the US version. Columbine, massacre, video games.

Oh indeed. A recipe for media disaster. (-_-“)

I hope society can learn from this too, accepting differences of other people instead of persecuting them. Maybe the Akihabara tragedy may have been avoided if the world, and all the people in it, were in a more open-minded state of being.

Truth. It’s a jaded fact we have to believe in.

Posted By: meganeshounen On: June 11, 2008 At: 3:52 pm

Unfortunately, not everyone is as willing and open as the inhabitants of Hatsunejima (or Minatsu’s friends, in that certain story). One can only wish…

Posted By: DrmChsr0 On: June 11, 2008 At: 7:19 pm

You can lead a horse to water but you can’t force him to drink it unless you’ve conditioned him to do so.

Japan has had a lot of Pavlovian conditioning; it’s not going to be easy to break them out of it. It runs deep into their culture.

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